Transparency in Supply Chains (TISC)

Freedom is all of our business.

Our vision is a world where every worker has human rights.

Authored by former Senator Darrell Steinberg, CA TISC Act requires the largest retailers and manufacturers in CA to publicly disclose their policy about what they are doing to eradicate enslavement and human trafficking throughout their product supply chains. The TISC Act has also paved the way for consumers to use their purchasing power for good.
Prior to this legislation, the only things companies were required to disclose were their policies on gender and race.

In 2007, ASSET launched an online campaign aimed at encouraging consumers to engage their favorite brands about their supply chain policies. We discovered high consumer interest, and low corporate engagement. 

To date, ASSET’s work in passing the CA Transparency and Supply Chains Act has influenced several other regulations targeting human trafficking, including the UK Modern Slavery Act, and has become a benchmark for consumers and companies worldwide. Since the passage of the Modern Slavery Act, TISC has been enacted in Australia, and is currently advancing in NSW Australia, Canada, the European Union and the Commonwealth.

Of the 67,000 consumer emails generated, only 58 company disclosure responses were received.

In 2007, ASSET launched an online campaign aimed at encouraging consumers to engage their favorite brands about their supply chain policies. We discovered high consumer interest, and low corporate engagement.

To date, ASSET’s work in passing the CA Transparency and Supply Chains Act has influenced several other regulations targeting human trafficking, including the UK Modern Slavery Act, and has become a benchmark for consumers and companies worldwide. Since the passage of the Modern Slavery Act, TISC has been enacted in Australia, and is currently advancing in NSW Australia, Canada, the European Union and the Commonwealth.

“The aim of TISC was to break that impasse of legally-protected denial around forced labor in the supply chain and supply chain practices, with a catalytic foot-in-the-door law. That law created an enabling environment for stakeholders and solutions alike to incrementally build to necessary corporate accountability over time, as efforts scale.”

— Julia Ormond, Corporate Compliance with the California Transparency in Supply Chains Act: Anti-Slavery Performance in 2016

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